Macau – Day 1

After our long day of travel, we had a slow start. We had done the necessary research on the best Dim Sum in Macau and by far the recommended choice was “The 8”. Our reservation was for 11:30 and we were on time – and hungry. The doors to the restaurant should have given us a clue. They were black mirrored glass and as you approached them they automatically swung open. Very cool. The decor inside was amazing. Terry was enthralled with all of the textures, shapes and colours in the room.

There were two sets of these Life Saver chandeliers.

There were two sets of these Life Saver chandeliers.

The ball was about 4 feet in diameter and reflected in the black marble platform.

The hanging crystal ball was about 4 feet in diameter and reflected in the black marble platform.

The "goldfish" were amazing.

The “goldfish” were incredible.

The most impressive decorative feature were the several hand embroidered panels of cloth with huge gold fish on them, backlit and hanging from ceiling to floor the entire length of one wall – maybe 40 feet long. The description is very poor and the photo doesn’t do it justice either – but you get the idea.

And then there was the food. We anticipated that, as in Vancouver, they would come around with trays of things you could choose from. Not so. They have a Dim Sum menu you choose from and they bring the plates of 3 or 4 items to you.

T.L - "Hedgehog" dumplings with hot soup inside; T.R. Black chopstick to take food from communal plate, white chopstick to eat with; B.R. Crispy Pork Bun; B.L. Abalone "Goldfish" stuffed with mashed Taro

Top left:  “Hedgehog” dumplings with hot soup inside; Top right: Black chopstick to take food from communal plate, white chopstick to eat with; Bottom right: Crispy Pork Bun; Bottom left: Abalone “Goldfish” stuffed with shrimp

T.L.

Top left: Pork & Potato Filling; Top middle: Fried Shrimp in Taro Straw basket; Top right: Puff Pastry with Mushroom Filling; Bottom right: Pan Fried  Cod fillet with yam; Bottom left: Abalone with Chicken and Mushroom

It was not only unbelievably fabulously delicious – it was far less expensive than we thought it would be. In fact it was less than 1/2 to 1/3 of what we anticipated. Plus we had several glasses of wine and a beer. We may very well go back before we leave.

From there it was off to the Wynn Casino with its concourse of top end, designer, name brand shops – Versace (Ed. note: who wears that stuff, let alone buys it?), Tom Ford, Bulgari, Chanel, Dior etc. etc. Ken wandered in and out of the shops – we wandered down the concourse gawking. Although we did go in to Tiffany’s  – sadly there was nothing Terry liked.

After that, it was a meandering wander to the top of the “Fortress” from where the Portuguese would defend Macau and then in to the rather disappointing museum.

The Fortress - not as impressive as Nanjing's wall, but it would have difficult to breach.

The Fortress – not as impressive as Nanjing’s wall, but it would have difficult to breach.

Macau Skyline

Macau Skyline

Our pal Ken

Our pal Ken

The ruins of St. Paul's Cathedral

The ruins of St. Paul’s Cathedral

Then it was back down to the hotel via the wandering lanes and incredibly neat, clean and tidy streets, to get ready for our big night out at the City of Dancing Water.

Juxtaposition of old and new - the traditional buildings and the Espirit Outlet shop

Juxtaposition of old and new – the traditional buildings and the Espirit Outlet shop

One of the many connecting staircases around Macau

One of the many connecting staircases around Macau

The Shoe Blog

I admit it – I am fascinated with the women’s shoes in this part of the world (Ed. note: A fascination NOT a fixation!). They are wonderfully cute and inexpensive – if you can find your size. Terry has very little luck. But more than the shoes, are the adventures you see women having as they try to navigate their way around the streets and hills.

It is much steeper than it looks.

It is much steeper than it looks.

I took the shoe photo while the woman’s teen age daughter (in the runners) was watching and smiling at me. I had no idea what was about to happen. As they left the store and started down the hill, the woman was confident but careful. About the time she got to the first black square, however, her heel caught one of the grooves and she started to go down. Luckily her daughter and friend were on either side of her and in sensible shopping shoes. They grabbed her and then the three of them gingerly walked down to the crossing (and much flatter) street. Most of the streets and sidewalks in Macau are cobblestones or tiles – why do people women wear these heels? (Ed. note: But I’m glad they do!)

You just never know...

You just never know…

6 thoughts on “Macau – Day 1

  1. lois marsden

    Hello Geoff….gave up wearing high heels when my intelligence kicked in and realized walking around in heels that create back issues, enable falling was beyond being cute…or a statement of someone elses fashion sense. But I do like looking at the variety you find….Some of the boots are cool…each to their own desires.

    Reply
  2. pkintzinger

    I like to use the word “hobble” when I see women in those platforms with the 6″ heels to boot … a nice little 4″ heel on a flat soul seems ever so sensible now, but my limit is probably 3 if I’m not going far. So sad! I like the look of Macau. You guys have had a spectacular couple of weeks! I’m so excited for you that Sam and Joe are also coming to visit – I know how you’ve wished for that, Terry! Enjoy the rest of the holiday – back to the old grind on Monday!

    Reply
  3. Gerry Marsden

    Gerry Marsden here. You have tweaked my interest in high heels. I am almost ready to try them while playing golf here in Palm Springs. It can’t possibly hurt my game the way it is going.
    Cheers, Gerry

    Reply
  4. Joan Hendrcks

    I was updating Dennis on your blog and funny, he was just reading in the paper this week about Macau, they do 45 billion US in 36 casinos which is more than 7 times the amount earned on the Vegas strip!
    We have to go there! Ha, Ha!

    Reply

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