Anping, Ancient Village

(Ed. note:

  1. First of all, I must issue an apology to many many people. I was cursing those of you who hadn’t bothered to make comments over the past little while – particularly on the most recent posting, which I had decided was among my finest work and where I gave you all an obvious opening with the title. However, Karen and Mal pointed out this morning that for the past little while, the comment section has been closed to them. So please accept my apologies for the nasty things I was saying about those of you who wanted to comment but couldn’t. Also, please let me know via email or when you see us starting next week if this has been a problem for you. Thanks.
  2. Today’s post is a pictorial display. Captions by Terry.)

 

All the photos in this blog were taken in Anping, one of the original townships on Taiwan.  First stop was at this place, the Julius Mannich Merchant House, where we had a passable fast-food style lunch.  Snore.  Give it a miss if you ever visit.

All the photos in this blog were taken in Anping, one of the original townships on Taiwan. First stop was at this place, the Julius Mannich Merchant House, where we had a passable fast-food style lunch. Snore. Give it a miss if you ever visit.

 

A temple viewed from Fort Zinlandia.  Many religions have taken root on Taiwan, from different forms of paganism to Buddhism, Taoism, Confuciousism (?), as well as some Christian forms.

A temple viewed from Fort Zinlandia. Many religions have taken root on Taiwan, from different forms of paganism to Buddhism, Taoism, Confuciousism (?), as well as some Christian forms.

3.

This is a view from Fort Zinlandia (the Dutch had a foothold here and built a few “Red Hair” forts), looking back toward the city.

4.

Sort of a map on the wall of the lookout tower in the fort.  FYI, it had to be at least 35C when we were wondering around this village.

5.

This is a giant model of an Anping specialty:  a long coiled fried bread thingy filled with cream or ice cream, we’re not sure.  See the regular sized unfilled models hanging above?

6.

I stumbled upon this place coming back from buying yet more water.  The baskets are filled with the shucked shells of oysters.

7.

On the other side of the canvas, this is what you see–an entirely female cast, busy shucking oysters.  Notice the ergonomically correct seating.

8.

The women at this end of the work space are the only ones smiling.  They rinse, size and weigh each shucker’s oysters, and keep a tally on a blackboard.

9.

In case you couldn’t recognize the ages of these ladies, have a look.

10.

Judging from the gray hair and hunched backs of most of these ladies, they have been doing this job for a long time.

11.

Here’s the tally board.  Looks like a few people called in sick this morning.

12.

This is a sword lion.  When a soldier came home, he put his lion-faced shield on the door to indicate he was home and put off would-be robbers. Once the town-folk recognized that it worked, they took up the sword-lion imagery to protect their places.  They are an Anping icon.

13.

This little house is part original stone work, part add-on brick.  The bicycle-truck on the left fits with the ramshackle nature of the place, but notice how clean the street is.  The big yellow bag is full of recycling, cardboard separated and out front.

14.

Taiwan is peppered with all kinds of temples.  This style is different from any we have seen elsewhere in Asia–so intricate and colourful!  I was struck that these bolts of colour and design is missing from the Chinese landscape.

15.

Another view of the city from an elevated platform at the Anping Tree House.

16.

There’s the platform and where those giant banyan trees are is the site of the treehouse.

19.

It’s not really a treehouse but rather a house overtaken by the trees and preserved in order to create a tourist attraction.

18.

Where the root to the left does a hard right angle down is where a wall once stood.

19.

These gators look like they want to invade the tourist center.

20.

Part of beautiful local art on an exterior wall.

23.

A street vendor washing oysters.  The water goes from under the sink into the storm sewer.

The Shoe Blog Dresses Up (?)

The women of Taipei, Taiwan and Tainan, Taiwan have generally been quite well dressed – despite the heat and humidity. They clearly don’t shop at any of the four stores below.

24.

Just when you think – there couldn’t be an uglier dress in Tainan than these two…

24a.

…you see 3 more…

24b.

…and then 4 more – but all of these pale in comparison to…

24.d

THE WINNER!

12 thoughts on “Anping, Ancient Village

  1. pkintzinger

    Oyster shucking as career … and I sometimes think I have cause to bitch about my lot in life. Perspective is everything! They are likely not that much older than we are. Or, perhaps this could be my post-retirement way to make “pin money” – would never have anything to spend it on, as no one would want to be around me. hoho

    Hey I kind of like that dress, on the left in the first picture. Would look cute on a petite little thing, if she chose her shoes well!

    There, I’ve done a response! Let’s see if it works … see you soon!

    Reply
  2. Rich R

    Dear Wattsie’s. I signed up to read the blog, and follow the travels and adventures of my pals. I must say that it has been enjoyable and fun, but no where did it suggest, imply or in any way require a comment or response. So, needless to say that I was shocked when I(we) were berated because of no comments. Please accept this as a comment from a hurt and apologetic blog reader. Hopefully, it’s just the heat, and you’re in a better mood when you get home. You know how sensitive I am, and can probably only guess what a turmoil this dressing down has done to my fragile emotional persona.
    Faithful blog follower and reader, Rich R

    Reply
    1. martincreggguinan

      Hear! Hear! It escaped my CONSCIOUSNESS that we would have to reply, but I was WONDERING about it. See you later this week!

      Reply
  3. Joan

    Awesome pictures! I thought those dresses were all kind of cute! Very much the style around here right now for younger girls!
    Yes, have a safe trip home. . .

    Reply
  4. Barb

    I am now up to date! I was a few blogs behind but enjoyed every word this morning. The pictures are great and the stories are even better. Sure hope I get to see you two when you get back to Vancouver.

    Reply
  5. Tom&Maureen Rippon

    Just sitting and getting caught up on the recent blogs. Hope we see you when you are home. Safe trip.

    Reply
  6. Val Goodridge

    Who thought that small black birds’ nests would be an elegant addition to that last dress!!! Maybe next year you could alternate the shoe pictures with ugly dress pictures. LOL I do enjoy all the pictures you include of your travels. What an adventure you guys are having. Enjoy your visits with all the friends and family back home in BC this summer.

    Reply

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