How Many $%^&ing Times Can I Miss the Sign?

After Sevilla it was off to Cordoba. Now Cordoba is a nice little city – nothing spectacular but interesting in its own little way. Lots of little alleyways to get lost in, a nice bridge to walk across, decent photo opportunities. You get the idea – nothing much to write about. They do have the Mezquita however. At one time it was a Moorish mosque but the Christians came to town and turned it into a cathedral. Then the businessmen came to town and turned it into a tourist attraction. It is really quite exquisite however.

The archways …

and pillars were spectacular.

The archways and pillars were spectacular

As was the ceiling.

The most interesting story was when I set up my 21″ tripod to get a photo or two – which is exactly what I managed to take before a very stern security guard was in my face, telling me to put it away and that if the security cameras saw me take it out again I would unceremoniously be escorted from the premises – at least that is what his tone implied. After that we just wandered the streets.

Puente Romano crosses the Guadalquivir River.

Terry poses on the Puente Romano crossing the Guadalquivir River.

Jan and Peter pose on the Puente Romano crossing the Guadalquivir River.

One of many tiny side streets

Another narrow passageway

Terry does her happy dance when the sun finally comes out – temporarily. Then we went into the cold Mezquita…sigh

Happy Happy

The smallest Hop on Hop off bus I’ve seen.

Some of the largest doors I’ve seen.

There are no words – except Ale-Hop is a store that just sells everything from toys to scarves to slippers to inexpensive and cheerful gifts to take home (not that we did).

Then it was off to Granada, home to the Alhambra. The Alhambra, for those of you who may not remember their grade 8 Social Studies, is a palace and fortress complex largely built by Nasrid emir Mohammed ben Al-Ahmar of the Emirate of Granada, who built its current palace and walls. It was converted into a royal palace in 1333 by Yusuf I, Sultan of Granada. As with most things in Spain, it was taken over by Christians and  the site became the Royal Court of Ferdinand and Isabella (where Christopher Columbus received royal endorsement for his expedition.) But before we got there, we had to get to our hotel, thus the title of this post.

When we arrived in Granada it was raining and I was driving. Granada has more one way streets than any city I have ever been in. The map doesn’t do it justice. Our hotel was about 15 yards off the street which has the little one way arrow. On one side of it was a street which was about 15 feet wide and dead ended at the hotel doors. Unfortunately it also had a wall which blocked the sign that said “Turn here”. On the other side of the hotel was a pedestrian walkway. If you missed the turn – which I did the first two times by, you have to spend 15 minutes to go out of the downtown area and return. Frustrated? Your call. In addition, there were all sorts of demonstrations going on which caused a large police presence. See below

“Women in Spain went on strike on Thursday both from professional and domestic work in the country’s first-ever general feminist strike. To coincide with International Women’s Day, ten Spanish unions on Jan. 14 called for 24-hour strikes and the country’s two most important unions have asked members to stop working for two hours on Thursday.”

Of course we would show up right in the middle of it.

On strike – sort of…

Would you expect Terry and Jan to sit on the sidelines?

After the demonstration we wandered off to – you guessed it – some little lanes and squares. This square – somehow I have lost the photos, had a statue of Neptune. This blonde must have had Chinese blood in her somewhere. She must have seen 15 minutes taking her photo, flicking her hair and just basically demonstrating she was a DIVA!

You’re beautiful – yes you are.

From there it was time to stroll – ha ha – up to Albaicin to get a view of the Alhambra from above. Stroll – ha – how about mountain climb. It was a very healthy climb – my heart handled it – but barely.

A couple of views.

Unfortunately, on the way up we got separated from Pete. He wound up at a different viewpoint which has a fantastic view.

Great view.

After reconnecting we wandered back to the impossible to find in a car hotel. We decided to go to El Conde for dinner – a mere 5 minute walk. We arrived at 7:45 and they didn’t open until 8 and I mean 8. The wait was beyond worth it. There were about 8 of us when it opened and when we left you couldn’t move. As with most restaurants in Spain, it was tapas. They have a strange, but incredibly wonderful custom in Spain. Strangely I didn’t experience this when I was there with a group of grade 10s many years ago. If you order alcohol (which, obviously I would never have done as a responsible adult supervising little children) they bring you a starter. Our starter was a burger and fries.

I’m not sure how small the bird was that dropped the egg was, but it was small.

As most of you know, Geoff does not eat salad – “This was INCREDIBLE,” he said.

The patatas brava had an injected hot sauce. You move the “injector” around from patata to patata. We have discovered, however that spicy in Europe isn’t like spicy at home.

Patatas Bravas

The two guys working there were terrific.

Two great guys

So that was our first day. Next time – The Alhambra. See you then.

 

 

 

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