Hola Mexico City

Well here we are. The last few days of this wonderful adventure. From the heights of Sacsayhuaman (near Cusco and pronounced “sexy woman) elevation 12,142 feet to below sea level in the Galapagos, from seeing what brilliant ancient cultures could create to learning how the Spanish attempted to obliterate both Incans and Aztecs, from standing on the equator to standing on the peak of Huayna Picchu, it has been a fantastic experience. I hope you have enjoyed seeing some of what we saw.

We arrived in Mexico City at about 2:00 pm and got a taxi into town. Very civilized. You go to a counter at the airport, tell them where you want to go, pay them, they give you a chit, you go outside, choose a taxi to fit all your bags in and away you go.

I’m not sure when we go back to the airport if we will take the same route. I think the driver wanted us to feel we were back in China. He took us down a street where there were blocks and blocks of shoe stores.

It got narrower.

The shoes – well, some of the shoes. Men’s shoes, women’s shoes, shoes in boxes, shoes on racks…

It was at this point, while we were crawling along that an armed (ie. machine gun toting) policeman stopped us and said something to the driver. “Am I not supposed to take photos?” I naively ask. “No, he said to roll up the windows.” is the driver’s response. Oh.

We finally arrive at our very lovely yet inexpensive ($720 for 6 nights) hotel – The Historico Centrale where we are told that all of the food and non-alcoholic beverages available at the little coffee counter are free. Sandwiches, paninis, baked goods, smoothies, chips, pop – all free. It takes us two days for this to actually sink in. Welcome to Mexico City.

There is a two story living wall. Spectacular.

And a 6 story atrium.

By the time we get cleaned up and have a welcoming drink it is heading towards dinner time and we head up the three blocks to the Zocalo or main square, stopping at Pata Negra bar for the worst margarita ever served by one of the surliest bartenders ever.


She wasn’t so surly when it came time to pay the bill though. Then she was all sweetness and light. She asked if the margaritas were good and I lied and said yes very good. Martin gave her 500 pesos (about $32.00) for a 280 peso bill and she wandered off, staying at the far end of the bar for a good 5 minutes, waiting for us to leave. She finally came back with the change. No fleecing these gringos senorita.

From there it was across the street to watch these guys for awhile. Who takes a drum kit to busk? (FYI It’s only about 40 seconds long and then loops back to the beginning.)

Zocalo is the third largest square in the world, after Tiananmen and Red Squares. Obviously, it is huge. On one side is the Mexico City Metropolitan Cathedral, on another side is the National Palace, on another is City Hall and other government buildings and on the last hotels.

At night they are all lit up. Except for the cathedral, they all change colour every few seconds or so.

The Cathedral


National Palace

City Hall


Hotels

The Zocalo in daylight.

It is dominated by the largest national flag I’ve ever seen.

We had dinner at Salon Corona, thinking we had stumbled on a cool little restaurant. Yeah, right. There are at least 10 of them within a 5 minute walk of our hotel. But they serve a good draft…

and a not bad slushy margarita.


You remember Julie Andrews and “The Hills are Alive”? Well in Mexico City, it is “The Streets are Alive”. After dinner we came across this group. Subsequently when we passed this corner there were other classical music performers equally talented. This is almost 3 minutes long but I just couldn’t stop videoing. Please enjoy. (I don’t know whose finger that is!😂😂)

In addition we have also heard a couple of 5 or 6 year olds sent by their parents to perform on Calle Francisco I Madero, the main pedestrian walkway. They strum a couple of old toy guitars and yell out lyrics of some kind or other. It was disturbing to say the least but it is a necessary evil in this and many other parts of the world. (We have also heard music blasting from the 3rd and 4th floor discotheques and an incredible opera singer singing from the third floor balcony of a restaurant. Unreal or maybe surreal.)

From there it was back to the hotel for a glass of wine, a wonderfully comfortable bed and best of all no wake up call.

Buenos noches. Mañana.

2 thoughts on “Hola Mexico City

  1. PETER G THERRIEN

    I’m sure the cathedral was very understated inside, very much like Spain and Portugal?

    Reply

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